Monthly Archives: July 2009

AMARI

Children wait for cabbage and rice provided by Every Child Ministries.  Many of the families rely on NGOs and mission organizations for support, since it is difficult to harvest near the camp. Monica washes herself outside of her hut in Tegatatoo.   A girl gets her hair braided by her mother.

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  • Alex Klonick - Amazing pictures!ReplyCancel

  • Richard C Shermer Sr - Megan , you photography is terrific, its very moving. We would be honored if you would consider doing a story for TCAF’s website about your experience in Gulu and the Camps. Sincerely RC ShermerReplyCancel

SPEECHLESS

Gabriel holds an empty vodka packet in the Tegatatoo IDP camp.  Immorality and drunkenness overwhelm the residents of the IDP camps, setting bad examples for the children. A woman spreads millet over a blue tarp.

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  • Pennie - Hi Megan, Please take good care of yourself honey. Give Andrew a big hug from me when you see him. Can’t wait to see both of you when you get back. Amazing photos. Love ya PennieReplyCancel

  • Jonas Sickler - Stunning photographs Megan- all of them. Your portraits are beyond words.ReplyCancel

“DEAD UNDER THE ROCK”

The women work in the fields near the Tegatato IDP camp with their babies on their back.  They only make 1,500 shillings a day (about 75 cents), which isn’t even enough to by soap (about 2,000 shillings).   Janet, 14, works in the field with her baby to make only about 1,500 shillings.   The […]

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APOYO

This child has malaria.  The conditions in the camps, and the distance from town make it difficult to heal. The potbelly comes from malnutrition and parasites. This baby was sleeping on the floor of a hut near a cooking fire midday.

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IDP

Still catching up…. More photos: This woman’s name means death because her mother had so many miscarriages that she thought she would be dead as well. This child cried and cried and cried at lunch time.  During our lessons, the older (and by older, I mean of age 5-6 yrs) are responsible for their younger […]

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